Oppose H.J. Resolution 83, Which Would Undermine the Safety of American Workers

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) is an important safeguard for American workers. Its regulations don’t just apply to those whose jobs require physical labor—nearly all Americans who hold jobs are protected by OSHA regulations. This joint resolution would limit OSHA’s ability to cite employers who violate workplace injury and illness requirements. Currently, when an employer violates record-keeping requirements, OSHA has up to 66 months from the time of violation to cite or impose a penalty. However, if H.J.Res 83 passes the Senate, OSHA’s jurisdiction would be limited to six months after the records violation occurred. This joint resolution effectively decreases OSHA’s ability to hold employers in violation of records-keeping requirements from five years from the date of violation to just six months. This puts workplace safety at risk, because employers will have little incentive to keep records: it’s unlikely that an already over-extended OSHA will be able to catch infractions in this extremely short timeframe.

The House has passed H.J. Res 83, but the bill still needs to clear the Senate. Tell your Senators that you support American workers and oppose H.J.Res 83.

Sample Call Dialogue

Throughout this script, replace “[Senator Hernandez]” with the name of your Senator.

Caller: Good morning/afternoon! Can you let me know the Senator’s position on House Joint Resolution 83 regarding OSHA record-keeping oversight?

OPTION 1: SUPPORTS DECREASING OSHA OVERSIGHT

  • Staffer: Thank you for calling! [Senator Hernandez] supports H.J. Res 83.

    Caller: I see. I find it upsetting that [Senator Hernandez] supports abolishing a regulation that keeps America’s workforce safe. This legislation decreases OSHA’s ability to cite employers in violation of record-keeping requirements from five years from the date of violation to just six months.This puts workplace safety at risk, because employers will have little incentive to keep records. It’s unlikely that an already over-extended OSHA will be able to catch infractions in this extremely short timeframe.

    Staffer: This bill does not limit OSHA’s oversight; it simply reverts OSHA’s citing power back to what it was before OSHA rewrote its regulation.

    Caller: Reducing the amount of time OSHA has to pursue record-keeping violations means that more record-keeping violations will occur, and OSHA won’t know about them. This very clearly puts American workers at risk. Requiring that employers keep records makes them more likely to prioritize workplace safety. If employers have nothing to hide, they should be able to keep records accurately. If [Senator Hernandez] cares about American workers who keep our economy strong, [he/she] should give OSHA the power to keep workplaces safe. That means opposing H.J.Res 83.

    Staffer: [Senator Hernandez] supports American workers. This legislation will decrease the cost of doing business for employers, which creates jobs and grows the economy.

    Caller: I’m a worker [or my loved ones are workers], and I disagree. Nothing is more important than keeping Americans — including its workers — safe. Will you notify [Senator Hernandez] that I think it’s wrong to support H.J. Res 83, because it makes American workers unsafe?

    Staffer: I will pass on your concerns to the Senator.

    Caller: Thank you.

OPTION 2: SUPPORTS MAINTAINING OSHA OVERSIGHT

  • Staffer: Thank you for calling! [Senator Hernandez] opposes H.J. Res. 83.

    Caller: That’s great to hear. This is clearly an attempt by the Trump Administration and its allies in Congress to dismantle an important worker safety regulation. Nothing is more important than keeping Americans — including its workers — safe. Thank you for standing up for American workers by opposing H.J. Res. 83.

OPTION 3: DODGES / HAS NO POSITION

  • Staffer: Thank you for calling! I am not familiar with that bill, but I’m happy to take down your concerns.

    Caller: That’s disappointing to hear — this is a very import issue for American workers, [myself/my loved ones] included. This legislation decreases OSHA’s ability to cite employers in violation of record-keeping requirements from five years from the date of violation to just six months.This puts workplace safety at risk, because employers will have little incentive to keep records. It’s unlikely that an already over-extended OSHA will be able to catch infractions in this extremely short timeframe. If [Senator Hernandez] cares about protecting American workers who keep our economy strong, [he/she] should give OSHA the power to keep workplaces safe. That means opposing H.J.Res 83.

    Staffer: I didn’t know that, but I’m happy to take down your concerns.

    Caller: Here’s my concern: we need and deserve protections that ensure a safe workplace. Loosening employer reporting requirements makes them less likely to prioritize workplace safety. If employers have nothing to hide, they should be able to keep records accurately. I expect [Senator Hernandez] to represent constituents like me by publicly opposing H.J.Res. 83. Will [Senator Hernandez] take this step to protect [his/her] constituents?

    Staff: I will certainly pass on your concerns to the Senator.

    Caller: Please do, and please take down my contact information so that you can let me know when [Senator Hernandez] has made up [his/her] mind. I’m eager to hear what [he/she] decides.

ScriptsCaroline Kavit